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First Life: Discovering the Connections between Stars, Cells, and How Life Began #2020

First Life Discovering the Connections between Stars Cells and How Life Began This pathbreaking book explores how life can begin taking us from cosmic clouds of stardust to volcanoes on Earth to the modern chemistry laboratory Seeking to understand life s connection to the s

  • Title: First Life: Discovering the Connections between Stars, Cells, and How Life Began
  • Author: David Deamer
  • ISBN: 9780520258327
  • Page: 182
  • Format: Hardcover
  • First Life: Discovering the Connections between Stars, Cells, and How Life Began By David Deamer, This pathbreaking book explores how life can begin, taking us from cosmic clouds of stardust, to volcanoes on Earth, to the modern chemistry laboratory Seeking to understand life s connection to the stars, David Deamer introduces astrobiology, a new scientific discipline that studies the origin and evolution of life on Earth and relates it to the birth and death of stars,This pathbreaking book explores how life can begin, taking us from cosmic clouds of stardust, to volcanoes on Earth, to the modern chemistry laboratory Seeking to understand life s connection to the stars, David Deamer introduces astrobiology, a new scientific discipline that studies the origin and evolution of life on Earth and relates it to the birth and death of stars, planet formation, interfaces between minerals, water, and atmosphere, and the physics and chemistry of carbon compounds Deamer argues that life began as systems of molecules that assembled into membrane bound packages These in turn provided an essential compartment in which complex molecules assumed new functions required for the origin of life and the beginning of evolution Deamer takes us from the vivid and unpromising chaos of the Earth four billion years ago up to the present and his own laboratory, where he contemplates the prospects for generating synthetic life Engaging and accessible, First Life describes the scientific story of astrobiology while presenting a fascinating hypothesis to explain the origin of life.

    • READ AUDIOBOOK ☆ First Life: Discovering the Connections between Stars, Cells, and How Life Began - by David Deamer
      182 David Deamer
    • thumbnail Title: READ AUDIOBOOK ☆ First Life: Discovering the Connections between Stars, Cells, and How Life Began - by David Deamer
      Posted by:David Deamer
      Published :2020-04-02T16:01:45+00:00

    1 thought on “First Life: Discovering the Connections between Stars, Cells, and How Life Began

    1. This gets 5 stars because the author isn t afraid to give little chemistry lessons as needed throughout the book This fascinating topic is attacked on many fronts.Chirality is the handedness of molecules, and life on Earth uses only one type for fats, nucleic acids, and sugars This mystery is considered as a possible frozen accident, and as a clue to life s origin.Undersea vents and clays are discussed as a possible origin of the basic metabolism processes which are found in all Earth life.The a [...]

    2. The book is of a text book than a popular science book The author is very good at stating what he s going to tell you, than tells you, and than summarize what he just told you.I understand chemistry even less than I understand bio chemistry and the book uses both extensively He ll explain the terms and often I wouldn t understand any of the technical words for whole pages minutes at a time, but I would always understand what his point was.The book is not for the faint of heart and is by far the [...]

    3. Deamer provides one of the most comprehensive and easy to understand biochemistry lessons offered in pop sci today His work on the possible origins of biotic life is captivating and exciting We are getting closer than ever to understanding how cells first emerged Deamer puts forth an ingenious study design Since then, scientists such as Nick Lane and others have worked on the same problems and come up with surprising results If you are not up to learning some lingo, this book is not for you Howe [...]

    4. I read Andreas Wagner s Arrival, John Tyler Bonner s Randomness in Evolution, and David Deamer s First Life Discovering the Connections between Stars, Cells, and How Life Began subsequently, so my review is meant to be read relative to the other two as all three overlap in subject matter This paragraph appears in all three reviews I am reading these books after reading several on cosmology I wanted to move beyond what cosmologists say with disagreement about the formation of the universe to see [...]

    5. Nothing is alive, or rather no thing is alive Life what ever that is can only happen as an emergent property of really complex systems in really special conditions Life is not a thing, its a process a special domain of chemistry, which is its self a special domain of physics People have a pretty good handle on how the universe emerged from nothing see A Universe From Nothing Why there is something rather than nothing by Lawrence M Krauss And people have a pretty good handle on how complex life r [...]

    6. First Life addresses the highly esoteric subject of the ways in which the first life creating molecules, monomers, polymers and substances may have come into being The science here is highly incomplete, and as a result many of the theories are unproven and speculative The author is biased towards his own theories, which is not a problem, except that it ends up making a large part of the book detailed and complicated than necessary for all but the experts.Most readers like the reviewer may never [...]

    7. Interesting, but at times repetitive and overly complicated I was a bit disappointed that there was only about a chapter on astrobiology, which I had assumed to be the main subject matter of the book Really, it s about the origins of life, and the astrobiology part is only a minor aspect of that I think I would have enjoyed this if I had a background in biochemistry It s really not meant for the casual reader.

    8. I m sure it would be fantastic for someone with a biochem background, but it s just too detailed and technical if you don t I still liked it, I just didn t get as into it as my friends who study biology.

    9. An interesting look at the emerging science of synthetic biology and the study of abiogenesis This book describes the fundamental foundations of life and how scientists are working on the mystery of how chemistry transformed into biology 3 billion years ago Excellent read.

    10. Some good parts, but full of fluff and random rambling digressions It would be better if it was 1 3 of the size The whole first half is only marginally relevant to origin of life research.

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