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Principios de una ciencia nueva en torno a la naturaleza común de las naciones #2020

Principios de una ciencia nueva en torno a la naturaleza com n de las naciones Durante la vida de Vico nadie comprendi totalmente su originalidad ni cien a os despu s de su muerte ni aun aquellos pocos que realmente lo leyeron ni sus fervientes admiradores napolitanos y veneci

  • Title: Principios de una ciencia nueva en torno a la naturaleza común de las naciones
  • Author: Giambattista Vico
  • ISBN: -
  • Page: 397
  • Format: Paperback
  • Principios de una ciencia nueva en torno a la naturaleza común de las naciones By Giambattista Vico, Durante la vida de Vico nadie comprendi totalmente su originalidad, ni cien a os despu s de su muerte, ni aun aquellos pocos que realmente lo leyeron ni sus fervientes admiradores napolitanos y venecianos en el siglo XVIII ni los hombres famosos que lo comentaron despu s tan superficialmente Ninguno antes de Michelet parece haber tenido la idea de que Vico hab a abiertoDurante la vida de Vico nadie comprendi totalmente su originalidad, ni cien a os despu s de su muerte, ni aun aquellos pocos que realmente lo leyeron ni sus fervientes admiradores napolitanos y venecianos en el siglo XVIII ni los hombres famosos que lo comentaron despu s tan superficialmente Ninguno antes de Michelet parece haber tenido la idea de que Vico hab a abierto una ventana sobre un nuevo campo de pensamiento.Giambattista Vico naci en N poles en 1668 y vivi all o en sus alrededores hasta su muerte en 1744 A trav s de su larga vida fue poco conocido, siendo un verdadero ejemplar del pensador solitario Fue educado por sacerdotes, trabaj algunos a os como tutor privado, lleg a ser profesor menor de ret rica en la Universidad de N poles, y despu s de muchos a os fue premiado en los ltimos a os de su vida al ser nombrado funcionario histori grafo del virrey austriaco de N poles.Para Vico los hombres se hacen diferentes preguntas acerca del universo, y sus respuestas est n conformadas en consecuencia tales preguntas, y los s mbolos o actos que las expresan, se alteran o se convierten en obsoletas en el curso del desarrollo cultural para comprender las respuestas se deben entender las preguntas que preocupan a una poca o cultura no son constantes ni necesariamente m s profundas porque se parezcan a las nuestras m s que otras que nos son menos familiares La relatividad de Vico fue m s all de la de Montesquieu Si su opini n fue correcta, fue subversiva ante la noci n de verdades absolutas y de una sociedad perfecta fundada en ellas, no solamente en la pr ctica sino en principio.Isaiah Berlin

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      397 Giambattista Vico
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      Published :2019-08-05T15:54:44+00:00

    1 thought on “Principios de una ciencia nueva en torno a la naturaleza común de las naciones

    1. I can t imagine what Vico was thinking when he wrote his observations I ve never read anything that contains so many seeds of future thought Marx Darwin Chomsky Freud Durkheim Nietzsche Foucault Adorno Rorty You re all here No wonder everyone from James Joyce to Edward Said has cited Vico as an overriding influence OK, so he s an ultra Catholic who believes in giants and refers to obscure Romans I m OK with that He lived in different times Regardless, I feel like I m gaining insight into one of [...]

    2. Amazing Over 250 years ago Vico laid the ground work for a huge amount of modern social critical thought His analysis of human culture based on language and physical geography, his refusal to glorify the past by drawing attention to the ridiculous ways we try project our own mental states onto distant history, his identification and analysis of the origins and evolution of human institutions, his analysis of conflict arising from the desparities between ultra wealthy citizens and common plebians [...]

    3. Um holy sh t.How on earth did a person conceive the possibility of a political genealogy of Jungian archetypes I do hope someone could do a serious errata archaeology in linguistics on the points Vico raised It should be seriously fun.

    4. Three ages, mythic, heroic, and human, matched with their own concepts of knowledge production, including, early, the poetic The master tropes that Vico identifies match up with K Burke s master tropes, which are, in both rhetoricians arguments, a kind of reasoning cf 404 409 Because anceint minds couldn t conceive of abstracts, they invented poetic forms, certain models or ideal portraits like Hermes the civil sage 209 and 767 8 The first fables, Vico says, were history 817 Claims that religion [...]

    5. I first read Giambattista Vico while studying James Joyce s Finnegans Wake, which employs Vichian concepts in its organization Inasmuch as the history of the Jewish peoples is recorded in the Bible, in The New Science Vico reconstructs the history of the non Jewish peoples, the Gentiles His unconventional approach to this history involves the analysis of Classical myths, etymology and figures of speech He is thought to be one of the first modern historians.

    6. Giambattista Vico s New Science which is in fact a loopy theory of the history of literature has proved to be a great flintstone Three times every century since it was published, some young thinker scratches his nose against it, sparks fly off and a new theory derived from it emerges.In the New Science Vico proposes that human history advances in a recurring cycle of three phases the divine, the heroic, and the human A special political system and language are proper to each age The divine age i [...]

    7. stunning it documents and challenges the conventionaly view of history as we may have been taught it is very religious in places and some of the theories are a bit bizarre but this is a really rich book and full of juicy bits of information the stufy of words and why certain things were called what they were roman and greek origins of words mainly fascinated me enormously it reminded me of a eloquent and arty and slightly left field version of jared diamonds guns, germs and steel it talks about [...]

    8. jittery rightwinger makes marxist seeming predictions but with fear trembling at imminent ochlocratic anarchistic egalitarianism OH NOS

    9. This will seriously bore you unless you are interested in Joyce, linguistics, philology, scholarly studies I read it during my Joyce phase.

    10. The text itself of the New Science consists of an overview, Idea of the Work, coupled with a picture depicting a female figure, Metaphysics, standing on a globe of the Earth and contemplating a luminous triangle containing the eye of God, or Providence Below stands a statue of Homer representing the origins of human society in poetic wisdom This is followed by five Books and a Conclusion, the first of which, Establishment of Principles, establishes the method upon which Vico constructs, in 1112 [...]

    11. It is only going to work if you make the imaginative effort to see that this book was written by a professional academic in Naples in 1744 and its author had no immediate plans to get sacked or imprisoned I personally sense that the accommodations required to remain safe within orthodox Catholic teaching sometimes show in the strained lines of reasoning used to achieve this I can even imagine some highly educated Jesuit rolling his eyes at it maybe less strain would have sufficed after all So I [...]

    12. So this book is in turns repetitive, dogmatic, and insightful Somehow its insistence on being systematic , and finding these grand parallels everywhere, gets in the way of the inquisitive and, admittedly speculative moments The etymological musings, the notion of a mental dictionary and the development story about language and culture were certainly thought provoking though at times a bit silly and forced The final two books seemed largely either repetitive or simply an affirmation of Vico s ow [...]

    13. The title is misleading It s a book that borrows techniques from science, and applies them to the study of human history New Science is an ambitious book If I can make an analogy Geologists have identified forces of wind, water, and fire that shape the landscape While Vico in this book has identified a force called divine providence which has shaped human relations and civil society The canvas he reads is not stone, it is human history itself From his readings he derives the principles of his ne [...]

    14. Vico, like most great writers, is hard to read I don t agree with all of his ideas He is very Christian and hostile to our faith and polytheistic people However, many of his ideas are very profound All Odinists should read Vico, along with Plato s Republic, Edward Gibbon s The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, and Oswald Spengler s The Decline of the West in order to understand why the West is in the mess it is today Vico gave a very good defense of feudalism.

    15. I had to abandon this one several hundred pages in while staying in a remote cabin on the Upper Russian Lake in Alaska that s saying something I scribbled this line on the inside cover in the darkness A cross between Pico della Mirandola and Ted Koszinski, minus the style of the former and the intelligence of the later, or vice versa The blurb on the back cover makes claims that Vico had significant influence on the likes of Marx and Joyce the connection is tenuous I would hazard.

    16. For it is an invariable property that, when human affairs appear to lack reason and even to contradict it, people resign themselves to the inscrutable counsels hidden in the abyss of divine providence Charmingly questionable speculations such as poo smeared babies growing into enormous adults broken up by long discussions of Roman law that made my eyes glaze over.

    17. This aberration was a consequence of that infirmity of the human mind by which, immersed and buried in the body, it naturally inclines to take notice of bodily things, and finds effort to attend to itself too laborious just as bodily eye sees all objects outside itself but needs a mirror to see itself.

    18. DID NOT FINISHThis is absolute rubbish Vico is quoting other authors and then making the most outrageous claims e.g Giants came from wallowing in their own filth, nobody had ever heard of the Jews which proves they are the most ancient people, etc without referring to anything to support his claims Such a waste of time.

    19. Relatively complicated read Deals with a lot of philosophy and works to combine science and rationale with history, literature, politics, and a cultural analysis of the primitive man.

    20. A fascinating analysis of history from the perspective of a philologist It also set up the school of historicism

    21. The etymologies are a bit out there but you can see how this leads into Hegel and Marx and the denial of an essential human nature.

    22. What a fantastic book It s difficult at times to know when to hone in and when to pull back, but it s also fascinating to see the threads of modernity and postmodernity present in his analysis.

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