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The Uses Of Literacy: Aspects Of Working Class Life #2020

The Uses Of Literacy Aspects Of Working Class Life Richard Hoggart s book made a tremendous impact when it first appeared in Required reading for anyone concerned with the modern cultural climate commented the Times Literary Supplement of a stu

  • Title: The Uses Of Literacy: Aspects Of Working Class Life
  • Author: Richard Hoggart
  • ISBN: 9780140204315
  • Page: 121
  • Format: Paperback
  • The Uses Of Literacy: Aspects Of Working Class Life By Richard Hoggart, Richard Hoggart s book made a tremendous impact when it first appeared in 1957 Required reading for anyone concerned with the modern cultural climate, commented the Times Literary Supplement, of a study of the huge social changes of the first half of the 20th century Mass literacy opened new worlds to new readers, but how far has it also been exploited to debase standaRichard Hoggart s book made a tremendous impact when it first appeared in 1957 Required reading for anyone concerned with the modern cultural climate, commented the Times Literary Supplement, of a study of the huge social changes of the first half of the 20th century Mass literacy opened new worlds to new readers, but how far has it also been exploited to debase standards and behaviour Hoggart explores an intriguing subject, and all these years after first publication it is still a work that rewards study.

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      Published :2020-02-11T19:59:23+00:00

    1 thought on “The Uses Of Literacy: Aspects Of Working Class Life

    1. It is amazing to read a book of cultural analysis, such as this, which is still relevant today as it was when it first appeared in the 1950s Its sensitivity and depth of analysis hold up against contemporary prejudices, unlike the work of F.R Leavis and other early pioneers of British cultural studies Hoggart s The Uses of Literacy still has much to say about class dynamics and the consumption of popular culture.

    2. This is a book I ve meant to read for years It s a bit of an icon, because when it was published it was something genuinely new an attempt to pin down the culture of the northern working classes and assess how general social changes have influenced it As such, it was a pioneer of that much derided and misunderstood area of academia, Media Studies.It was first published than fifty years ago, and we would expect that society has moved on a great deal since then and its relevance might be diluted [...]

    3. This gave my life foundation Hoggart and Raymond Williams, then later on Eagleton, helped a confused working class boy negotiate an understanding of culture and identity, power and ideology, values and a faith in the benevolent heart I reread it last year It has still its voice that supported and supports me.

    4. Not the source of insight I hoped it would be, not least because it is so out of date While Hoggart s worries about the malign influence of mass culture have proved well founded certainly to the extent that the working classes have not followed an upward path of intellectual and cultural improvement I cite the Daily Mail, X Factor and Brexit his 1957 analysis couldn t take in the effects some good, some bad of future phenomena such as mass immigration and the internet to name but two Coincidenta [...]

    5. I came to this book from Tim Lott s glorious memoir The Scent of Dried Roses , in which he described how his later discovery of The Uses of Literacy helped him fully understand his parents working class to lower middle class background and his mother s fatal combination of pride and huge shyness Its primary importance, I m to understand, is as a landmark of cultural studies in which respect it is a curious blend of current observation and self ethnography making it already a bit of a curiosity a [...]

    6. An excellent book, really mind broadening It s amazing to realize how much things have changed since Hoggart s time, in some ways, buy how little in others.

    7. I have read the first part of the three parts of this book and have severe misgivings that I will throw it out of the window before I finish it At the same time last year I was reading Leon Trotsky s monumental history of the Russian Revolution aswell as the critically revilved Mein Kampf I can tell you I had a lot enjoyment reading those two than this monumental and it only feels monumental pile of self indulgent drivel I have just completed a legthy chapter on pub and club songs Hoggart could [...]

    8. Yes, as some reviewers have said, this book is old fashioned However, it is still relevant for two reasons.1 It shows how people behaved and thought in the 50s It is told anecdotally and in a style different from scientific writing today but that is because is a product of its time which again makes it interesting.2 The author is prescient In the second half of the book he describes predicts trends we are worried about today including anti intellectualism, the decline of newspapers, the increase [...]

    9. I m struggling with this one a bit It is quite dated and patronising.The interview at the end from 1990 gives really helpful context I suggest reading the interview and then dipping into the book.

    10. Hoggart s comprehensive survey of working class culture published in 1957 is neither patronising nor sentimental He confronts his subject with clear and knowledgeable eyes, criticising the faults and acknowledging the values of the class he originates from himself.The opening chapters describe working class communities in the early decades of the 20th century their customs, family life, clubs, songs, love of ostentation and group mentality Such cohesion has the unfortunate flipside of rejecting [...]

    11. Hindsight is a wonderful thing and looking back, 60 years on, the reader can see how Hoggart was simultaneously right and wrong We may now have a hedonistic group individualism , but the things Hoggart criticises TV, American music, jukebox boys, gangster novels, now seem benign, some have been critically reassessed, and he doesn t foresee the future youth culture formed from the English working class, but influenced by the US I m not a fan of e.g the Beatles, but I can see that they are better [...]

    12. Hindsight is a wonderful thing and looking back, 60 years on, the reader can see how Hoggart was simultaneously right and wrong We may now have a hedonistic group individualism , but the things Hoggart criticises TV, American music, jukebox boys, gangster novels, now seem benign, some have been critically reassessed, and he doesn t foresee the future youth culture formed from the English working class, but influenced by the US I m not a fan of e.g the Beatles, but I can see that they are better [...]

    13. This is a book I ve meant to read for years It s a bit of an icon, because when it was published it was something genuinely new an attempt to pin down the culture of the northern working classes and assess how general social changes have influenced it As such, it was a pioneer of that much derided and misunderstood area of academia, Media Studies.It was first published than fifty years ago, and we would expect that society has moved on a great deal since then and its relevance might be diluted [...]

    14. Not sure that tome actually explored the uses of literacy That being said it did take an idiosyncratic look at working class life Quite droll in parts but disappointing if one is interested in the uses to which literacy can be set

    15. A landmark book in the field of Cultural Studies Best read now as a historical document as there is little similarity between the class Hoggart wrote about then and society today most interestingly one of the similarities is the low opinion of politicians.

    16. This book is a tough read at times But the ideals and concepts forwarded impact our lives to this day Not a book I would have selected myself, but am delighted to be introduced.

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