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Savage Dreams: A Journey into the Landscape Wars of the American West #2020

Savage Dreams A Journey into the Landscape Wars of the American West In a war began in what would become Yosemite National Park a war against the indigenous inhabitants that has yet to come to a real conclusion A century later and about a hundred and fifty

  • Title: Savage Dreams: A Journey into the Landscape Wars of the American West
  • Author: Rebecca Solnit
  • ISBN: 9780520220669
  • Page: 276
  • Format: Paperback
  • Savage Dreams: A Journey into the Landscape Wars of the American West By Rebecca Solnit, In 1851, a war began in what would become Yosemite National Park, a war against the indigenous inhabitants that has yet to come to a real conclusion A century later 1951 and about a hundred and fifty miles away, another war began when the U S government started setting off nuclear bombs at the Nevada Test Site, in what was called a nuclear testing program but functionedIn 1851, a war began in what would become Yosemite National Park, a war against the indigenous inhabitants that has yet to come to a real conclusion A century later 1951 and about a hundred and fifty miles away, another war began when the U S government started setting off nuclear bombs at the Nevada Test Site, in what was called a nuclear testing program but functioned as a war against the land and people of the Great Basin Savage Dreams is an exploration of these two landscapes Together they serve as our national Eden and Armageddon and offer up a lot of the history of the west, not only in terms of Indian and environmental wars, but in terms of the relationship between culture the generation of beliefs and views and its implementation as politics.

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      276 Rebecca Solnit
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      Posted by:Rebecca Solnit
      Published :2020-05-06T18:21:29+00:00

    1 thought on “Savage Dreams: A Journey into the Landscape Wars of the American West

    1. Solnit has a remarkably distinct voice I found the first part of this, which takes place at the Nevada Testing site to be the most effective But that s not to say the second part, with its real history early ethnic cleansing behind the creation of Yoesmite National Park, doesn t fit under Solnit s umbrella title Savage Dreams Solnit s subjects are deeply troubling, nevertheless her voice is a hopeful one that focuses on what the committed individual can accomplish through activism You may not ag [...]

    2. I recently reread this book and was completely enraptured a second time Rebecca Solnit has a beautiful and succinct voice, using language that is at once poetic without being overly flowery yet cuts to the heart of the matter of whatever she s writing about Solnit is a magnificent researcher and is remarkably even handed as well, providing SO much vital information and her p.o.v while allowing the reader to come to their own conclusions on the history she lays before us This book was particularl [...]

    3. Solnit does this brilliant thing many writers including me, yet can t get away with she writes rambling narratives in which seemingly disparate topics collide by the end of a chapter into a sensemaking that no linear, expectable essay could possibly achieve Book 1 is set mostly in Nevada over the 20th century, amidst the indigenous fight for sovereignty and the fallout of nuclear devastation It reminds me of Susan Griffin s Chorus of Stones, except Solnit is there, and tells us so I like the str [...]

    4. A stunningly intelligent, if meandering walk through a complicated landscape of deserts and nuclear weapons, political activism, Native American rights, our view of nature and the history of Western expansion Solnit writes with a blend of personal, philosophical and journalism observation that can at times be scattered, but do add up to a brilliant whole It s like talking to one of the smartest people you know, but whose conversation jerks from topic to topic, with connections only he or she can [...]

    5. Skillfully crafted dual narratives deconstruct the mythologized, pornagraphized Yosemite Valley which was in fact the cultivated garden of the native population eradicated to create a consumable wilderness intellible to expansionist and romanticist sensibilities Particularly poignent is the anecdote about the displaced chief, brought back into the park and told that Tioga Lake had been named for him Morosely, he replied, it already has a name Whew

    6. This book is quite dense but filled with information and interesting connections that prompted much thought during and after reading My main complaint is the confusing timeline, especially in the first part of the book Solnit describes her experiences transgressing the Nevada Test Site and working with activists But along the way she diverges to explain their journey and maybe even another encounter she had with that activist before going back to the main timeline Confusing and not really necess [...]

    7. Explains a LOT about the current way of thinking of federal private lands and their use God, I love her writing.

    8. Very interesting and very informative I was particularly struck by the fact that the natives had used burning to take care of the land We have been told so long that the land fared best when no one at all had lived on it Turns out that s just not true, and for me that was heartening to hear It isn t the earth vs man it s the earth AND man working together that gets the best results They need each other.

    9. Solnit s gift and genius is tying together strands from history, art, culture, the environment is surprising and profound ways Here she explores the United States war on the people and land that are in what we draw as blank spaces on the map and which are anything but empty, through the specific lens of the Nevada nuclear test side where nearly a thousand nuclear explosions were set off between the 1950s and 1990s In part 2, the book shifts to Yosemite Valley and the way Californians have lived [...]

    10. So I read this book for a class on Environmental Literature at grad school I started it in Boise, but didn t get into it for the first 70 pages or so, but then got really hooked It s a brilliant book, a kind of non fiction novel of ideas that is well researched, smart, perceptive, and really self aware It s essentially two books, the first longer part is about the Nevada test site and the history of nuclear bombs and the United States The second shorter half presents the buried history of the cr [...]

    11. Solnit takes on a plethora of topics in her attempt to understand the place of the American West in the American psyche The book focuses on two landscapes the Nevada Test Site and Yosemite National Park on her journey through two hundred years of history that relies on framing American expansion as the discovery of new lands and paradise and not the annihilation of resident native populations Most fascinating for me was the discussion of the Euro American idea of nature and wilderness that brand [...]

    12. I went into this book hoping for a detailed history of the struggle over land usage in the West What I got was an antinuclear testing political book that touched lightly on the history and focused on meanderings on the author s family which usually didn t apply to the focus of the book , making a bunch of leftist stereotypical statements that were leftist than even I prefer, mixed in with some but not enough useful history about nuclear bomb testing in Nevada Not what I was looking for, so I d [...]

    13. This is by a local Northern California gal The first half of the book is about the fascinating history of the Nevada Test Site, the author even visits the site where the first nuclear bomb was dropped there and darn its not open to the public The second half of the book is about the history of Yosemite So in essence a discussion of man made heaven and hell Very facinating, great research, good nature writing with a fresh philosophical bent.

    14. Adventurous, entrancing, insightful, enraging a deep dive into the hidden histories of the Nevada Test Site and Yosemite National Park, and the author s personal experience within those histories Weaving together history, politics, people and landscape Learned so much about the complicated past and present of two unique places in the American landscape Love the author, wonderful writer writes non fiction that is super alive.

    15. I loved this book that stares and stares at the vastness of the west, both real and imagined, and finds words Solnit speaks to the American perspective of the nuclear testing and environmental damage enacted on these open desert lands as a act of collective amnesia, and explores the role this land plays in the American sense of self A beautifully wrought book.

    16. I loved the first half of this book so timely given that I was reading about radioactive fallout when the quake hit Japan I couldn t get into the second half of the book and called it quits, but since it s an entirely different albeit connected topic, I feel okay about recommending the book anyway.

    17. The first part of the book is about the Nevada Test Site where the US continues to explode hundreds of nuclear bombs every year Don t read this unless you re okay with getting really pissed off at the government.

    18. Another excellent book from Rebecca Solnit Her writing amazes me constantly with its perfect blend of history, theory, and memoir I m frightened of nuclear testing now and, if I ever make it to Yosemite, will be a informed observer.

    19. Wow This book was very influential for me I love books that can address the meaning of life, the way we use land, politics, history, and personal experience they are not only poetic but highly readable This is worth the time it takes to read.

    20. I enjoyed the portions of the book that discussed the history of the nuclear sites and Yosemite and most of Solnit s expositions about the concept of the West , but certain parts describing her personal experiences as a protestor detracted from the greater story.

    21. Wonderfuly written and very important book I found that I became increasingly depressed and upset reading it and I just put it down The truth is such a bitter pill.

    22. Only read about 60 pages The language was so flowery, and the narrator so irritating, I couldn t finish it.

    23. Surpisingly readable account of things unbearable to think about.I will add to this before too longe also quotes in updates.

    24. Simultaneously brilliant and dark, original and depressing, lyrical and thoroughly expository I sigh, knowing I will have to read everything Rebecca Solnit has ever written.

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